Winterfest 5k Almost Snowshoe Race

09 Feb 2017 5:36 PM | Anonymous
     According to a study by Columbia University researchers, the longer you mull over a decision the more likely you are to choose the wrong option.  In other words, go with your gut feeling and get on with your life.  This is what I should have done the week before Winterfest as I tried to map out a snowshoe-friendly course.  Normally, the choice is obvious, but this, sadly,  is not a normal winter in our region (once more and with feeling).  What made the verdict so difficult is that the first part of the route was marginally doable.  But by the pool area things deteriorated and so I scouted farther afield, spending wasted time jumping from snow patch to snow patch before I reluctantly threw in the ice bucket.

            Even so, I stubbornly clung to marking the Ferndell bypass route up the steep hill just in case Saturday evening granted a winter reprieve.  Jamie Howard, our intrepid webmaster (www.dionwmacsnowshoe.com) emailed me this helpful bit of advice, “If you’re taking a long time, you probably know that the right decision is the choice you don’t like, and you’re putting it off hoping things will change somehow.”  …But remember that year, once upon a time and long ago, when things looked especially glum and we actually were gifted with a surprise snowfall on Saturday evening?  While the park could still accommodate casual snowshoers and skiers, those willing to take a roundabout tour and walk gingerly across bare gravel and pavement, it would be a disaster for folks intent on barreling on through.  Or at least for their snowshoes. 

            IRunLocal, one of our sponsors, should have set up shop at the race site.  They would have sold out of traction devices.  Fortunately, folks brought extras and everyone was accommodated.  Still, it was a beautiful sunny day, and goodness knows we haven’t seen much sun lately.  Hero Dad Scott Starr brought along his wife and three kids.  The youngest remained with Mom, while the others circled the quad beside Scott until he finally bent down and piggybacked the younger of the two.  I traveled alongside until the end of the loop when he jettisoned the kids and went on to achieve 13th overall.  For him, the family experience was more important that first shot at the raffle prizes.

            London Niles, who became a Dion series member as a pre-teen, mentored by various participants as he gained skill and height, is now in college.  He brought his youngest sister Solitaire, who was excited to choose Winterfest for her first 5K race. London would always wait and cheer for me along the course after he finished and, true to form, as he headed back out to run in with Solitaire, warned me of an icy spot just ahead while uttering those famous lines, “You’re almost there!”  Just like the old days, except this time, naturally, I knew every inch of the course.

            It was remarkable how many finished within a second of each other.  Stryder Shaun Donegan beat mountain runner Tim Van Orden by a mere second.  The same for Jim Schertzer, Mason Collins and Derek Zwickle; Vince Kirby and John Webber; and Jennifer Ferriss and Maureen Roberts. Many others were separated by no more than a few seconds.  Hearteningly, we have progressed from attracting a random kid once in a while to hosting six 14-and-under participants.  That is all the more remarkable when you consider the fact that we had 45 total finishers and 13 year-old Jackson Katusha grabbed 7th place, just ahead of the first place woman, 59 year-old Peggy McKeown.  So never say you are too young or too old!

            The real heroes of the day (besides Scott) were the course marshals who guided racers around a building construction course change and then, once sweep Pam Delsignore passed through, evaluated the situation and played musical flags, placing themselves at other potential trouble spots.  As we all know, racing eats up your brain cells, so as I circled the route, I congratulated myself on having the foresight to reposition the orange jackets. Until I eventually realized that the volunteers had gotten the big picture and had coasted on their own momentum.

            Which is the amazing thing about directing a race.  Despite all your planning, there comes a point day-of when the event takes over and snowballs in whichever direction it chooses.

 

By laura clark

copyright Saratoga Stryders, 2016
The Saratoga Stryders, a 501(c)(3) affiliate chapter of the Road Runners Club of America. P.O. Box 1467, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

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